What is Autumn Home?
Why was Autumn Home established?
What is one of the primary work-related missions of Autumn Home?
What is the mission of Autumn Home?
Who was Mozella Jordan Price?
What is the history of Camp Winonah?
When is the site open to the public?
Where is Camp Winonah located?


What is Autumn Home?

As a private, nonprofit charity, Autumn Home sponsors services for people with special needs while continuing in the renovation of historic Camp Winonah, the Mozella Price home place. Autumn Home is sponsored by At Home Case Management, LLC.

Why was Autumn Home established?

Autumn Home has been organized exclusively for charitable, social, educational, and humanitarian purposes: the establishment of a historical landmark, promote study and research sites, document and commemorate historical contributions for human rights, civil rights, and education, promote self-reliance, and dispel racial over-sensitivity.

What are two of the primary work-related missions of Autumn Home?

Promote self-reliance through work-related pursuits:

To encourage and help cultivate a special needs-focused workforce through direct or indirect training, enrichment and learning opportunities. These opportunities may be fostered in a variety of constructive ways not limited to but possibly including self-employment, sheltered or non-sheltered work industry, day support and other program settings. Such programs should creatively generate increased output via incentive, with a focus on but not limited to recycling, packaging, producing, renewing, and developing various supportive operations. The goal of these operations is to promote the fundamental concept that one may increase one's self-reliance and decrease government dependency through increased decisive participation to earn a living based on productivity, thrift and implemented programs for cost effective work opportunity.

Promote true independence by encouraging increased understanding:

To nuture the principle that there needs to be a greater focus and applied effort to foster increased self-reliance. To no longer expect others to do that which we can do for ourselves. To offer various housing opportunities and build an awareness of a health-conscious lifestyle. To know that true freedom and individual independence requires an ongoing individual application of effort for it to be initiated, sustained, and neither apathy nor passivity have a place in true American culture.

What is the mission of Autumn Home?

The mission of Autumn Home is to preserve the legacy and history of the original home and former owner, Mozella Price. Some of the long-term goals include creating a summer camp for children and adults with special needs and creating a summer job site for people with special needs. The job site would provide a place for people to grow, harvest, and sell their own fruits, vegetables, and gifts. Another goal is to take original wood from the renovations to Camp Winonah and have a workshop for people to make keepsakes to commemorate the history of the site.

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Who was Mozella Jordan Price?

Mozella Jordan Price was instrumental in improving the education and quality of life for African Americans in Appomattox County. She was educated in Farmville schools, attended Boydton Institute, Virginia State College, and earned a Bachelor of Science degree from Hampton Institute and a Master's degree at the Teacher's College of Columbia University in New York City. Mozella Price became one of Appomattox County's most popular and dynamic teachers. From 1919 to 1963, she served as the Supervisor of Appomattox County African American Schools. Mozella Price secured donations to build a small four room school to house the elementary school and high school in 1930. Following her death, her sister Peg directed the extra funds to be used to build the Carver Price Cultural Center to fulfill another of her dreams. The county's African American schools were consolidated and enlarged in the town of Appomattox in 1952. To honor Mozella Price for her hard work and dedication, the former school building was expanded and renamed the Carver Price School. Her dedication to the training of young minds also led Mozella Price to start Winonah Camp for underprivileged boys in her large home in 1933. Girls were admitted into the camp in 1936. Children attending the camp came from as far away as New York. Throughout her life, Mozella Price shared her home with many children as a foster parent. In the late 1940s, the elementary school burned down. Mozella Price used her home as an interim school where she and several teachers taught multiple grades throughout Winonah Camp. Before her death in 1971, Virginia State College honored Mozella Price with a certificate for her outstanding services in education and in helping underprivileged youth.

Information on the Camp Winonah Historical Sign
Site #1 on the Civil Rights in Education Heritage Trail


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What is the history of Camp Winonah?

Camp Winonah was originally built as the residence of Mozella Price and her husband in 1931. Later she decided to start a camp, first named Winonah Camp, for underprivileged boys in 1933. The goal was to offer a place to train and educate the youth from the comforts of her own home. In 1936, girls were admitted into the camp. Children attending the camp came from as far away as New York. The site was also used as an interim school in the 1940s after the local elementary school burned down. Mrs. Price and several teachers taught multiple grades. The name was eventually changed to what is now Camp Winonah. The home still rests on the same location in Appomattox, Virginia. However, the site is now the private charity Autumn Home.

Information on the Camp Winonah Historical Sign
Site #1 on the Civil Rights in Education Heritage Trail

Where is Camp Winonah located?

Historic Camp Winonah, the Mozella Price home place, is located directly on Hwy 460. It is the first stop on the Civil Rights in Education Heritage Trail. The site is a little past the town of Appomattox. From east of Appomattox it is 1 mile before town; from west of Appomattox it is 1 mile after the 4th overpass. It is about 3 minutes from the Appomattox Court House National Historic Park and 3 minutes from the Carver-Price Cultural Museum and will be 3 minutes from the new Super Walmart.

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Click to enlarge



Camp Winonah Brochure, 1936

Camp Winonah Reunion, 1951

Jordan Family

Jordan Sisters
Elsie, Anna, Mozella, Julia, Peggy

Mozella Jordan Price

Civil Rights Article, 2001